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How to Build a Resume That Stands Out Visually To Help Your Teen Land Their First Job

Creating a captivating resume that sparkles bright enough to catch an employer's attention is an art on its own terms.


With the ramp up pressure kids experience at school and the need to sign up to too many extracurricular activities, it’s no surprise how the number of teens employed have been declining over the past decades.
There are many benefits (and risks) of adolescent employment. The decision to allow your teen to have an after school job should be a well thought-out family decision based on how well they can manage responsibilities, time management and money.


But if your teen is ready to take the plunge the first thing they need to figure out is how to build a resume that stands out even if they don’t have any work experience.


But where to start? How do can you create a snapshot of your ambitions, show your strengths and interests and captive an employers attention?
This is the part Canvas comes in and rescues the day. If you are unfamiliar Canvas, this is a graphic-design t…

Mothers With One Child Are Happiest ? Do you Agree?





Conventional wisdom dictates that people become parents because children bring joy. But do they really? For scientists studying the subject, simply correlating parenthood and happiness can't answer this question, since happy people might be more likely to have kids to begin with. But a recent study that compared happiness levels in adult identical twins--some of whom are parents and some who aren't--may be getting to the bottom of the issue.

In a study, headed by sociology professor Hans-Peter Kohler of the University of Pennsylvania, found that people with children are, in fact, happier than those without children. But such happiness gains differ for mothers and fathers.
In comparing identical twins, Kohler found that mothers with one child are about 20 percent happier than their childless counterparts; and while fathers' happiness gains are smaller, men enjoy an almost 75 percent larger happiness boost from a firstborn son than from a firstborn daughter. The first child's sex doesn't matter to mothers, perhaps because women are better than men at enjoying the company of both girls and boys, Kohler speculates.

Interestingly, second and third children don't add to parents' happiness at all. In fact, these additional children seem to make mothers less happy than mothers with only one child—though still happier than women with no children.

"If you want to maximize your subjective well-being, you should stop at one child," concludes Kohler, adding that people probably have additional children either for the benefit of the firstborn or because they reason that if the first child made them happy, the second one will, too.

Kohler adds that most previous research has asked how specific factors—such as marriage or childbirth—contribute to happiness. His study, in contrast, asks a general question about parenting and happiness.

Thoughts? 

Personally, I believe this study is controversial and does not take in consideration cultural, religious and individual circumstances.

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