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How to Build a Resume That Stands Out Visually To Help Your Teen Land Their First Job

Creating a captivating resume that sparkles bright enough to catch an employer's attention is an art on its own terms.


With the ramp up pressure kids experience at school and the need to sign up to too many extracurricular activities, it’s no surprise how the number of teens employed have been declining over the past decades.
There are many benefits (and risks) of adolescent employment. The decision to allow your teen to have an after school job should be a well thought-out family decision based on how well they can manage responsibilities, time management and money.


But if your teen is ready to take the plunge the first thing they need to figure out is how to build a resume that stands out even if they don’t have any work experience.


But where to start? How do can you create a snapshot of your ambitions, show your strengths and interests and captive an employers attention?
This is the part Canvas comes in and rescues the day. If you are unfamiliar Canvas, this is a graphic-design t…

Summer Safety! Children's Healthcare of Atlanta Urges Families to Leave Fireworks to the Professionals

 

Children's Healthcare of Atlanta is reminding families to be safe this July 4th and avoid directly handling fire-related devices like fireworks and sparklers. During this time of celebration, Children's urges everyone to leave fireworks to the professionals.
 
 

"The Fourth of July is an occasion to celebrate outdoors and spend time with family, but nothing ruins a party like a trip to the emergency room," says James Fortenberry, M.D., Director of Critical Care Medicine and Pediatrician-in-Chief at Children's Healthcare of Atlanta.  "With the long list of local professional firework displays available, there's no reason to risk life-threatening injuries and burns by putting on your own show.  Leave the fireworks to trained professionals."

According to the National Fire Protection Association, during the weeks surrounding July 4th an average of 200 people visit an emergency room with fireworks-related injuries.  Fifty-seven percent of all fireworks-related injuries occur during this time each year.  The risk of fireworks injury is highest for children ages five to 14, with more than twice the risk for the general population.



Children under 15 years old account for 39 percent of the estimated fireworks injuries, which can include burns, contusions/lacerations, concussion, scarring and even death, according to the Consumer Product Safety Commission.

A list of some Atlanta-area public firework shows can be found here.  For more tips on summer safety from Children's, please visit www.choa.org/summersafety.

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