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How to Build a Resume That Stands Out Visually To Help Your Teen Land Their First Job

Creating a captivating resume that sparkles bright enough to catch an employer's attention is an art on its own terms.


With the ramp up pressure kids experience at school and the need to sign up to too many extracurricular activities, it’s no surprise how the number of teens employed have been declining over the past decades.
There are many benefits (and risks) of adolescent employment. The decision to allow your teen to have an after school job should be a well thought-out family decision based on how well they can manage responsibilities, time management and money.


But if your teen is ready to take the plunge the first thing they need to figure out is how to build a resume that stands out even if they don’t have any work experience.


But where to start? How do can you create a snapshot of your ambitions, show your strengths and interests and captive an employers attention?
This is the part Canvas comes in and rescues the day. If you are unfamiliar Canvas, this is a graphic-design t…

Videos We Love: Obvious to you. Amazing to others. by Derek Sivers



Any creator of anything knows this feeling: 

You experience someone else's innovative work. It's beautiful, brilliant, breath-taking. You're stunned. 

Their ideas are unexpected and surprising, but perfect.
You think, “I never would have thought of that. How do they even come up with that? It's genius!” 

Afterwards, you think, “My ideas are so obvious. I'll never be as inventive as that.” 

I get this feeling often. Amazing books, music, movies, or even amazing conversations. I'm in awe at how the creator thinks like that. I'm humbled.
But I continue to do my work. I tell my little tales. I share my point of view. Nothing spectacular. Just my ordinary thoughts.
One day someone emailed me and said, “I never would have thought of that. How did you even come up with that? It's genius!”
Of course I disagreed, and explained why it was nothing special.
But afterwards, I realized something surprisingly profound: 

Everybody's ideas seem obvious to them.
 
I'll bet even John Coltrane or Richard Feynman felt that everything they were playing or saying was pretty obvious. 

So maybe what's obvious to me is amazing to someone else?
Hit songwriters, in interviews, often admit that their most successful hit song was one they thought was just stupid, even not worth recording.
We're clearly a bad judge of our own creations. We should just put it out and let the world decide. 

Are you holding back something that seems too obvious to share?

Derek Sivers book "Anything You Want" is available at Amazon.com.

 *Disclosure: This post contains an affiliate link. 

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