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How to Build a Resume That Stands Out Visually To Help Your Teen Land Their First Job

Creating a captivating resume that sparkles bright enough to catch an employer's attention is an art on its own terms.


With the ramp up pressure kids experience at school and the need to sign up to too many extracurricular activities, it’s no surprise how the number of teens employed have been declining over the past decades.
There are many benefits (and risks) of adolescent employment. The decision to allow your teen to have an after school job should be a well thought-out family decision based on how well they can manage responsibilities, time management and money.


But if your teen is ready to take the plunge the first thing they need to figure out is how to build a resume that stands out even if they don’t have any work experience.


But where to start? How do can you create a snapshot of your ambitions, show your strengths and interests and captive an employers attention?
This is the part Canvas comes in and rescues the day. If you are unfamiliar Canvas, this is a graphic-design t…

What's Happy This Week: Big Apple Circus Clown Care Unit!

 Clown Doctors Help Heal with Humor

I have a deep admiration for the “labor of fun” the Big Apple Circus bring to healthcare facilities, children's groups, and communities across the nation.
Clown Care, the signature community outreach program of the Big Apple Circus, brings the joy of classical circus to hospitalized children at 16 leading pediatric facilities across the United States.

THE HEALING POWER OF HUMOR

Circus Co-Founder Michael Christensen created the program in 1986 based on his desire to provide a unique service to youngsters undergoing treatment in pediatric facilities. In partnership with a participating hospital's chief medical and administrative staff, members of the Clown Care team conduct 'clown rounds,' their own version of medical rounds, where the healing power of humor is always the prescription.


PERFORMERS COLLABORATE WITH DOCTORS TO FIT THE NEEDS OF EACH HOSPITAL

Currently, 80 committed and talented professional artists conduct clown rounds one to five days a week, year-round, making nearly 225,000 visits to young patients every year. Clown doctors are trained in specific hygienic practices and protocols and in special issues related to interacting with hospitalized children. Performers collaborate with doctors and staff to design a program that fits the needs of each hospital. They visit children in both inpatient and outpatient units, including intensive care, emergency room, physical therapy, bone marrow transplant, pediatric AIDS, and hematology/oncology.



"Ministering to sick children goes beyond medication and technology. When a child begins to laugh it means he's probably beginning to feel better. I see the clowns as healers."
 - Dr. John M. Driscoll Jr., former Chairman of the Pediatrics Department at Morgan Stanley Children's Hospital of Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center in New York City

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