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How to Build a Resume That Stands Out Visually To Help Your Teen Land Their First Job

Creating a captivating resume that sparkles bright enough to catch an employer's attention is an art on its own terms.


With the ramp up pressure kids experience at school and the need to sign up to too many extracurricular activities, it’s no surprise how the number of teens employed have been declining over the past decades.
There are many benefits (and risks) of adolescent employment. The decision to allow your teen to have an after school job should be a well thought-out family decision based on how well they can manage responsibilities, time management and money.


But if your teen is ready to take the plunge the first thing they need to figure out is how to build a resume that stands out even if they don’t have any work experience.


But where to start? How do can you create a snapshot of your ambitions, show your strengths and interests and captive an employers attention?
This is the part Canvas comes in and rescues the day. If you are unfamiliar Canvas, this is a graphic-design t…

UC Berkeley Study Suggests Our Brains Are Wired For Kindness

Humans are, at heart, altruistic - or at least we are according to psychology Professor Dacher Keltner, of the University of California at Berkeley who has produced a cheering video to explain why.

  
"Most people think that Darwin had this idea of survival of the fittest and that it’s really the most ruthless and bloodthirsty who really thrive and survive. That is not Darwin’s view of human evolution at all. He really felt that sympathy is the strongest instinct that humans have".   Dacher Keltner
Greed is good. War is inevitable. Whether in political theory or popular culture, human nature is often portrayed as selfish and power hungry. UC Berkeley psychologist Dacher Keltner challenges this notion of human nature and seeks to better understand why we evolved pro-social emotions like empathy, compassion and gratitude.


We've all heard the phrase 'survival of the fittest', born from the Darwinian theory of natural selection. Keltner adds nuance to this concept by delving deeper into Darwin's idea that sympathy is one of the strongest human instincts — sometimes stronger than self-interest.

FEATURING: Dacher Keltner, professor of psychology and founding faculty director of the Greater Good Science Center at UC Berkeley. 
 

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How to Build a Resume That Stands Out Visually To Help Your Teen Land Their First Job